Stress as a Communication Pathway

Posted by on May 10, 2012 | Comments Off on Stress as a Communication Pathway

Most often, when we hear the word stress we think of anxiety or nervous tension. The clinical definition of stress however is a positive thing. In fact, without stress you’d be dead. Physiological stress is your body’s reaction to any stressor. It is generated in an attempt to maintain balance. Stressors can be environmental, emotional, or physical. For example, fatigue from staying up too late, the emotional strain from a death in the family, or a flu virus that has invaded your body are all stressors.

 

When a stressor presents itself your body uses biotelemetry to spread the word, communicating from cell to cell to enlist sufficient resources to compensate for the stressor. When the body’s response is adequate we continue to enjoy good health, we are in balance with our stressors. This is called homeostasis.  Homeostasis is not a static position; the body is constantly making adjustments, an estimated 100 million per second. For the most part we are unaware of these adjustments because our conscious mind is not designed to handle that much detail.  But even though we don’t hear the music, the dance goes on.

 

The music of this dance is what Biocommunication listens to, particularly the music of GSR. But instead of presenting the body with actual stressors, this technology generates virtual stressors, queries.  In this manner the body can be presented with a large number of simulated challenges, or questions, and by listening to the biotelemetry reflected in GSR the Biocommunication device receives the body’s answers.  It’s a stimulus-response experience.


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